Monday, 29 September 2014

The Funny Effects of Physics

 
Duvet cover lying on the ground

Still on a noise theme... lately we get woken up at our holiday home in the early morning by the sound of elephants thundering around on our (tin/flat) roof.  Last week-end I dashed outside and peered up, just in time to see two fat pigeons departing, presumably having consummated their spring revels. Speaking of thunder, we had a garden shed/Wendy house erected two weeks ago in the back garden.  Last week-end our famous South-Easter was blowing full force and every now and again I was startled to hear a sound just like in the old movies when the sound effects guy would wave a sheet of metal up and down to simulate the effect of thunder.  I was about to criticise our new shed's roof as being loose when hubby mentioned that he had also heard the noise and had traced it to a loose sheet of metal he had left on the ground which had propped itself up at one end on a stray brick. He fixed it. Finally, I gave some thought as to how to hang up my washing in this strong wind. The duvet cover, being large, I decided would be safest if I hung it up exactly in the middle, both sides hanging equally,  so that the wind would be unlikely to cartwheel it over the line and onto the other washing. How wrong can you be. In the morning, when the wind had abated, the only item trailing on the ground was the duvet cover.

5 comments:

  1. Elephants that turn into pigeons, your very own thunder machine, and a wind tunnel clothes dryer. Your new home sounds like such fun!

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    1. You are so right. It's all a question of how one looks at things.

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  2. Are you sure they were pigeons and not beaked giant tsetse flies?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FhfFwLewgmc

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    1. ...and I thought you would help me with a suggestion as to how to hang my duvet cover in a strong wind. (I'll check the Youtube thing later....)

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    2. Hang your duvet cover evenly and place a series of strong plastic clamps across the length of it instead of clothes pins. These are sold in tool departments for holding glue projects.

      http://www.homedepot.com/p/BESSEY-Assortment-of-Light-Duty-Plastic-Spring-Clamp-in-Various-Sizes-14-Piece-XC-14PC/205512956

      I would try these on a test rag first to make absolutely sure the clamp will not stain the material. Also make sure the spring is not exposed where it could get wet, rust and then drip on the material.

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