Wednesday, 23 January 2013

Over 60 Vertigo ?

Some of us only learn the hard way and that is certainly true of my husband.  I've mentioned his dizziness which has occurred periodically every day for the last six weeks. Eventually, he took my advice and paid a visit to the Ear, Nose & Throat guy who checked him out and then asked if he had bumped his head just before he noticed the symptoms. He had indeed: I remember, because he almost knocked himself out and saw the proverbial stars (which should have given us a clue then, as cartoon-fashion, they go round in circles, don't they?)  Apparently, such a knock can dislodge particles in one or more of the semi-circular canals of the inner ear; such particles then float about and settle in the wrong place, creating dizziness whenever the person looks up or down or bends suddenly etc. The cure is miraculously simple in theory: the doctor manipulates the patient's head in various ways and in between taps sharply on the bony area behind the affected ear, allowing half a minute for the patient to recover from the dizziness every time. This is followed by a regime of exercises over a few days. My husband did not comply very well with these and in fact, under my strict supervision, felt constantly nauseous, after the first repetitions and refused to do more.  In the end, he went back to the doc and after an interrogation, admitted that over the week-end he had climbed a ladder and wielded a hedge-trimming machine in order to trim back our bougainvillea which, beautiful though it is, has a bad habit of setting off our burglar alarm in the middle of the night during our windy months.  As this involved him looking up most of the time, he had succeeded in undoing the doctor's good work. So it has been back to square one except that this time he is spared the nausea-inducing exercises and has been told to walk around as if he has a stiff neck and to prop himself up in bed so that on no account can he roll over onto his left side for a week. No easy task. In a similar vein, I have been unable to do any of my urgent sewing as when I plugged in my machine the stitch size was stuck on huge, and the reverse function wouldn't work. I had lent the thing to my daughter, who says that we probably went over a bump on the way home when we fetched it and upset the computer.  Very frustrating stuff.  So far I am trying to Google a cure.  It's a Husqvarna 500 Computer. Anyone any idea?

8 comments:

  1. That is amazing about your husband. Literally loose marbles, albeit tiny ones. I never heard of that before. Remember when it comes to husbands you have the ultimate tool for compliance to all wishes. Make him take care of him self.

    The only thing I have ever seen with Husqvarna written on it was a chain saw.

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  2. Tsk, Sextant. I am not used to you not solving all my technical problems. NB - Husband blew all the (large amount of) accumulated fabric dust out of my machine, but it still won't work. Going in for a service this week. Meanwhile, am hand-sewing all hems in front of the TV. At least it keeps me awake. Daughter said she would pay half, while not admitting that sewing thick layers of canvas from grandson's trampoline net supports is what has stuffed up my tension.

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    1. When it comes to sewing machines, you probably want to keep yours away from me. When I was little I terrorized my mother's machine. All those cool knobs and levers. My little shit hooks (my mother's term as in "keep your little shit hooks off my sewing machine") had a good play with everyone of them. My mother claimed that I screwed up the tension on her machine and it was never right after that. My greatest shot with that sewing machine was my experiments with the foot treadle. Incredibly the treadle and power cord had matching male and female plugs. I pulled the plugs out of the back of the machine and plugged the treadle directly to the power cord. Then I stepped on the treadle. Boom, big flash, puff of black smoke, and the fuse in the garage blew. Ma wasn't happy. The treadle was welded about half way along its travel. Well she was going to have my father fix it, which would not have been good, so I fiddled with the thing got it broke loose. And worked it back and forth, and got the thing working again. There was a dead spot right in the middle but as long as you kept it faster or slower than the dead spot it worked fine. Lucky on that one. Never felt the need to repeat that experiment.

      I did another electrical experiment when I was 5 or 6 years old. I took the light bulb out of the lamp, stuck my finger in the socket and turned the light on. Refreshing! That was another experiment I never felt the necessity of repeating.

      Anyhow sorry I can't help with the sewing machine.

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    2. You sound like a very clever little boy to me.


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  3. I've tried to work with an old treadle machine - couldn't get the knack of it.

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    1. I call the thing a treadle probably because that is what my mother called it. I did not mean the foot powered treadle machines. The thing I smoked was a foot operated electrical floor switch that worked like the gas pedal in the car.

      I don't know how clever I was but I had a bad tendency to "monkey with things" as my father told me.

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  4. Oh, that is a modern one. We call it the 'foot pedal'. You must have tried hard to mess that up.

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    1. Quite actually it was very easy.

      The power cord had a unusual round female connector that plugged into the back of the machine. The foot pedal had the same unusual round connector but male that plugged into the back of the machine. The designers made it goof proof, no way you could plug the wrong cord into the connectors because of the genders. Plus the genders were chosen so that there is no way you could have an open male connector with power on it which would be a shock hazard. That part was designed correctly.

      What the designers hadn't planned on was busy little bastards (this was the 50s--there were many of us) with busy little shit hooks that liked to monkey with things. The connectors should have been a different size or blocked with a shield so that it was impossible to plug the cords together. They were exact matches of opposite gender and I plugged them together and then stepped on the foot pedal. What exactly my purpose was will never be known, but I remember being fascinated that the plugs fit together so nicely. The foot pedal was short circuited when I stepped on it. Thank God for fuses.

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